Was it “Trickle Down” or Golden Shower Economics? Afrikan Economics in the Post-Industrial Global Euro-capitalist Age

There has been an overall restructuring of the US economy which has permanently changed the mix of jobs and wages that are available, away from unionized manufacturing to low intensity mechanized production and finance capital which requires less workers, higher levels of training, but which, in an atmosphere of relatively high unemployment generates an employers market with low wages. I believe the “race to the bottom is on.” It will feature less jobs, less people eligible for the jobs available, higher educational levels required for the jobs available, and a gradual elimination of “safety nets”. Those who love the market, are about to be tested because they are about to see in a way that they have not, outside of the developing world, what post industrial, disaster capitalism looks like.

I believe Afrikan people have their future in supplying goods and services to themselves and in the development of communal entrepreneurial enterprises. I believe the old mantra where you raise your children to go get a job from Eurocentric plutocrats, while always counterproductive for the economic well being of the masses, is now not even an intelligent option. The future workers will create their jobs or they won’t have them. And since the market is very segregated by ethnicity, geography, and class, they need to focus their efforts likewise. Already the corporate sector has abandoned “American” marketing for a targeted group by group strategy that has paid tremendous dividends. Afrikan communities must focus on themselves. Dr. Khalid Muhammad noted that if Afrikans made toilet paper, just for themselves, that company would be the world’s largest toilet paper company the day it opened. Trust that if we do not open it, they will.

A tangible example. Each holiday, whether you like them or not (I generally don’t observe Eurocentric holidays, but most of our people do), our people buy millions of dollars of greeting cards. They usually hold their noses and go to Hallmark or any number of places where their cultural heritage and unique perspective on the holiday is ignored. Every once in while, one of the major retailers will get smart and have little “Afrocentric” cards but usually at a high price and in short supply. There are many young men who have art skills, distribution skills and connections, and this could turn in to an immediate enterprise that others could tie into. This is but one example. But right now our collective economic strategy, courtesy of the useless Negro leaders is essentially beg, bum, borrow, or steal. Beg the system for social welfare or some aid program, bum off of your own people not building any capital, borrow from Eurocentric financial institutions that invest almost nothing back into the community relatively speaking or steal which takes us back to the black market economy.

I am a Washingtonian, a Garveyite, and so on when it comes to economics. Kujichagulia in economics is not just a nice nationalistic idea, it is essential for our survival since what few jobs this economy will generate going forward will not be for the masses of our people. To fail to see that is be in a kind of Eurocentric denial of the reality that capitalism will ultimately distribute capital not to new players in the market for the most part, but largely to existing entities. Since we are not for the most part major existing players, we have to change the game. Come to the monopoly table after the property cards are all bought and no matter how you play your hand, if there is even a modicum of competence on the opposing side you will lose. We have been losing since the 1950s. We own less property, have less jobs, have less wealth, and are roughly collectively where we were in that period. I, like so many predicted this 20 plus years ago. In fact Claude Anderson said if we did not change the modus operandi we would be a permanent underclass by the 1980s. Well…..I like to be optimistic and say it does not have to be permanent, but the underclass part of it is clearly empirically established.

The ideological victory of Kingist economic integrationism and DuBoisian Eurocentric education as a vehicle for mobility has been our downfall. Examine the many success stories of immigrant groups and they all began by focusing on supplying critical economic needs of their own community and then branched out to provide the expertise they gained in that niche to the larger society. We are the only people dumb enough to pursue a strategy where we abandoned our capacity and interest in supplying our own needs and entirely rest on the willingness and capacity of others to do that. That guarantees that all of our resources go to others, in fact with debt more than we earn. Last year we generated more than a trillion dollars in economic wealth and today we have almost none of it, not one dime. That pattern is the pattern of a people who will die unless they become wise.

We wee literally told by those who call themselves leaders to get rid of our “little Afrikas”. It’s not that they did not exist. Afrikans in the late 1800s were among the country’s fastest growing productive groups despite enslavement of many (which is why that Hollywood lie that we were all and always slaves and that that is our collective narrative is so repugnant and insulting). John Sibley Butler did some great work on our economic successes of the past. The combination of the Klan and other white supremacists intentionally destroying our cities and towns and later the rise of a Negro leadership that told us that the goal of our movement was to give up our own for someone else’s was like a cocktail of strychnine and arsenic.

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