Concerning The Tithe

I believe the tithe was an obligation of the people under the Law but not of those grafted in under the new covenant. The tithe was an obligation imposed to care for two groups, the priestly class and caste who did no economically productive work outside of their duties. God knew that in the absence of a system of support, the clergy would begin prostituting the faith (we can learn from this today). The second group was the poor because the economic system of God required alms to those in need. These were agricultural people and there were times of plenty and little and the storehouse became a repository for grain and other sustenance goods for people in times of need. New covenant believers are not under the Law but the blood. The Lord specifically instructs His disciples to engage in gainful employment, apart from their “priestly” duties. Again the idea was to avoid the financial exploitation of the faith. Similarly the poor were to receive alms but not by gathering into a single storehouse as if you had a cloistered community but where they are ministered to by a dynamic, moving, and dispersed “church”, community of believers who take care of the poor, the sick, the blind, and the sinner as part of a new priesthood extended beyond a caste to all who invoke His power in spirit and true faith. The physical limited tithe and storehouse of the limited chosen becomes the universal priesthood of believers armed with collective and individual resources and a mission and desire to serve with the heart of Christ. Understanding the evolution here is vital because if you misunderstand, you end up collecting resources into the church as a business and in the clergy as a financial elite replacing the gospel of a Christ who gave all away including Himself, with a worldly “prosperity” gospel of accumulation. There is a major difference between a sometimes generous philanthropist and the faithful servant, between a charitable religious financial institution and the serving church of disciples.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s